On To The Mission At Hand…

 

In order for occupational therapy to be effective, the patient must be on time, and consistent with appointment attendance. I was not. A trip to my closest VA was a four-hour excursion. An hour one-way, an hour there and an hour back- with no traffic, which would almost never happen- I changed my appointments frequently when I had them with OT, so my therapist limited me to just splinting. And really, driving over two hours for each appointment. Something had to change, and for me, it was my location.

The VA does provide options to see local providers called, “Fee Basis”, but that’s a whole other post.

If You Skipped to the End

I will be posting more about my progress in occupational therapy to restore function to my hands devastated by scleroderma, called sclerodactyly. Today, I will share a milestone: I was able to wear the splint for my right hand through the night, two nights in a row. Woo whoo!

 

Hand in splint designed by patient's occupational therapist for patient with scleroderma

Notice how the splint is cut around boney prominences to avoid pressure sores.

 

 

hand in a splint made by an occupational therapist to gain or maintain range of motion.

Yes, that is nail polish. I’ve been moving, there’s no time for a manicure. Don;t judge me!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the pictures, there is some hyperextension going on in the ring and pinky DIP’s or distal interphelangeal joints. The splint will need to be adjusted. It feels comfortable to me, but as I strengthen, that hyperextension will be counterproductive and possibly harmful in the long run. During my fitting appointment, my hands were further back and the DIPs were in line. So, my hands have opened up some and my fingertips have crept toward the end.

Are you receiving occupational therapy?
Please give me a shout if you are. I’d like to know how others are doing. Hand therapy for functionality is not just for scleroderma patients. I meet stroke patients, paralysis patients, RA patients and more. So let me know what goal you are working toward. My goal is to maintain what I have, and gain some functionality. Of course I’m shooting for the stars for being able to play some guitar again, but I will be happy with even a small gain. Post your progress in the comments. Not for me, but for other patients who might read and be encouraged, or learn from your difficulties.

Thanks!

 

Link Sources:

Scleroderma Research Foundation

Joint Replacement.com

You can make a difference and help fund scleroderma research:

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