Paraffin and Scleroderma: Comments on an article about scleroderma.

There is an article about a woman with scleroderma in the United Kingdom all over Facebook and too many social networks to list here. I have a few comments to make. Her methods of skin care work for her and kudos to her for having the time and resources to have a full body paraffin bath every day, but I have a few comments and some alternatives.

picture of oils for skin moisturizing in various   containers

Oil feels nice, but the type of oil used may create more work.
Applying oil can appear to be helpful, but many oil based products only coat, and do not penetrate to moisturize skin, especially petroleum based products. As someone who has used olive oil, Kama Sutra oil and too many moisturizers to name here, I can say honestly that oil coats the skin, leaves marks everywhere and leaves (me, it may vary for others) a dry skin surface in about 15 minutes. Many products claim to have “essential oils”, but if they come in a plastic container, they are not true essential oils.

Undiluted essential oils should  only be stored in glass containers, because a true essential oil will may break down the plastic. The right essential oil can  nourish moisture starved skin because it will penetrate, not coat.  Essential oils can appear more expensive, but you need less of the product.  To find the best essential oil for you, don’t be shy about asking for samples or asking for a low priced sample to take home and try a few days.

Essential oils are not your only option.
A great non-petroleum based cream or lotion works well if you can find one.  I have had great luck with Aveeno Moisturizing cream oil with sweet almond oil and Eucerin.  Currently, I use Votre Vu’s Snap Dragon on my body and their hand cream Duette for my hands because I love it, and I sell it (for full disclosure) so I get a great deal on it.    If you have something that works, don’t go searching for an essential oil.  (If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.)

Ahhh, Paraffin.  It is nice…
Paraffin does work, but as a full body bath, the first thing I thought, (okay, second thing I thought…)  was this sounds wonderful, but is an unrealistic and expensive option for most scleroderma patients.  A simple hot bath with immediate application of a non-petroleum based moisturizer while wet, followed by stretching or assisted yoga (after drying off and dressed of course) will provide the same benefits.  A hot bath will warm the muscles, making them easier to move, which is the objective of the paraffin bath.  When I first started exercising again in 2005, I would take a shower before and after.  Warming up those muscles before warming up, is good for body and mind.

The professional manicurist in me speaks up: 
I have been working with paraffin since 1987. First as a manicurist, then as a scleroderma patient. A full body bath in paraffin really does sound awesome, but I would like to offer an alternative for 2 reasons.

1. Patients with raynaud’s have a bigger risk for burns with paraffin. If one with raynaud’s were to place their hands in a paraffin bath that was even slightly too hot, it can cause tissue damage to the extremity, going from extremely cold to hot. And because of impaired temperature sensation, a raynaud’s patient may not be able to detect the bath is too hot. Thermometors can fail.

2. Open sores. One must never use paraffin if there are any wounds because of risk of infection.

Tips for using a parrafin bath for patients with Raynaud’s:

1. Place hand in plastic paraffin bag, then dip bag into paraffin.

2. Scoop hot wax with hand using the bag as a barrier between hand, then turn bag inside out when removing from paraffin wax. (This will take practice. Don’t be discouraged by a little mess)

3. Now, you have a bag of wax and you can feel how hot the wax is through the plastic. Use your forearm or wrist to touch the outside of the bag to feel how hot the wax inside the bag is. If it is too hot for your forearm it is too hot for your hands, feet or whatever it is you are placing in the wax.

4. Once the wax feel cool enough to tolerate COMFORTABLY, place your hand inside the bag.

Never, EVER use paraffin wax when you have an open wound or pressure sore.  Yes, even a paper cut.  Don’t make me show you pictures of infected wounds- it’s nasty!

For more information:

Medscape detailed article: Musculoskeletal rehabilitation in the person with scleroderma.

Pub Med Abstract: Musculoskeletal rehabilitation in the person with scleroderma

Raynaud’s Risks and Prevention

The Scleroderma Society

Tips for Living with Scleroderma, by Scleroderma Research Foundation

To help fund research for scleroderma, visit: Bounce to a Cure

FAQ for Raynaud’s by The Raynaud’s Association

Handy Hints for Raynaud’s by Raynaud’s & Scleroderma Association, UK

Visit The Mighty Turtle on Facebook for more scleroderma organizations.