I’m Not Here to Inspire You

The character Morpheus from The Matrix with a copation that reads, "What ifI told you that when you tell me you thought you were having a bad day, but then thought of me and realized my life is not so bad" Do you know that you are not helping?

Disability and illness are cruel, but having them does not make an individual special. This may not be a popular opinion, but it is mine. Since I have both disabilities and chronic illnesses, I will take the floor.

I have been called brave, a warrior, or described as “suffering”. I have had great difficulty helping people understand why these terms are used a little fast and loose for my taste.

I’m told often how courageous and brave people think I am. Really? I’m not brave because I live with an illness and disabilities. What’s the alternative? I’ve said it in prior posts that living with obstacles doesn’t make me brave; it just means I’m not dead. Being not dead is certainly a reason to celebrate, but it doesn’t make me brave. I’ve had conversations with people who say to me, “I was having a bad day, until I thought of you. I know that no matter how bad my day is, it couldn’t be as bad as yours. I have no reason to complain, your life sucks compared to mine. I mean really, I don’t know how you get out of bed every morning to face the day. I would probably kill myself if I were you.” (Every one of those statements have been said to me.)

Everyone should be able to have a bad day, and not feel guilty about it. On the surface, maybe “my life is not as bad as yours”, may sound like a compliment, or that your validating their struggle. No. That’s like saying, “My life is okay, but yours- it’s really bad. Oh my God, you have a terrible life. I am so happy not to be you. I feel so much better now, because my life could be so much worse!”

Having a disability or illness does not mean that my life sucks. Look, I would never say my illness is a gift. That’s stupid. But yes, my life is good. I am rare because I receive veterans disability benefits in addition to ordinary disability benefits. To be quite honest, I don’t know if I would have lived so long without it. Back before it was against the law to discriminate against pre-existing conditions, (and even now) patients who need specialized doctors outside their network of care will die prematurely because their budget doesn’t afford them the luxury to pay the out of pocket network co-pay, and/or non-formulary medication. The United State citizens fear terrorist attacks more than people dying from lack of needed specialized care and prevention. You know what’s frightening? The comparison of Americans who have died from terrorist attacks vs citizens dying due to lack of medical care. Citizens of our country think it’s okay to call people on disability lazy, and denying coverage because some a**hole commits fraud. And yes, there are things in place that prevent a disabled person from supplementing their income. Because if they do, and it gets over between $500-$800, they loose their benefits and suddenly it’s no longer supplemental. So when illnesses flare and they don’t have the resources to pay co-pays for specialists and medication. Suddenly, they’re worrying about rent and food. And don’t get me started on pain management. It has nothing to do with pain and everything to do with preventing addiction. We force people to wait months at a time to see pain specialists because doctors have restricted abilities to prescribe pain medication. Yes, addiction has to be in the equation somehow, but thanks to a generation of medical breakthroughs, but lack of access to treatment due to income made handing out pain medication like M&Ms a preferred treatment. I once paid $5.00 for a prescription for percocet and $50 for the antibiotic to cure the problem. If I had to choose between food for my kid or medication until payday, I’d hang in there with the Vicodin until payday. Now, the stigma of pain medication has become so bad, people will walk around in excruciating pain, than risk being labeled an addict. This is why people listen to Jenny McCarty and Food Babes of the world. They promise them health because in the past, treatment was not available.

We are so dumb as a species.

Wait, what were we talking about?

Using terms like brave, etc… People have asked me how I’m doing, and instead of embracing the exciting things I share with them, I will get, “Oh Karen, you are so brave. You don’t need to be brave for me. How do you really feel?”

I have been complimented on my strength to get out of bed and dress myself. I’ve been give credit for just showing up. People show up, every damn day.

I hate being called a scleroderma warrior. I am not at war with my body. I’m trying to make it strong and healthy. I want the organs of my body to work together so I can go out and do things. I think that makes me a negotiator, not a warrior. My body is not at war. My body is negotiating peace with factions who disagree with one another. It takes time, patience and work, but we all do it. As we age, we do things to prevent high blood pressure and diabetes. We stop eating fiend foods because our metabolism slows down. The things I do to stay healthy, are the same as anyone else. Sure, some the medications are different, but the intent is the same: We’re negotiating for more time on earth. We’re giving in to concessions like taking medication and avoiding chili dogs, to live longer. I don’t know about you guys, but I’m 45 and I am working to get at least another 50 years.

When people ask how I’m doing, I will tell them I feel good, and they won’t believe me. They’ll reply with statements like: ‘Oh you must really suffer”; “I know you’re suffering”. Are they listening? No.

I could say, “Today, I won the lottery, had sex with Chris Hemsworth and instead of breaking up, my boyfriend congratulated me.” And I bet I would still get, “Oh, you are so brave. I just don’t know how you do it.”

I have shared a video in this post of a TED Talk featuring Stella Young. She nails it. Please watch. She is far more entertaining than this post.