Glenn Frey’s Death: Risk vs Benefits of Medication

This month we have lost entertainment icons. I listened to David Bowie’s album, Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars while afloat during Desert Storm, Shield and Watch. When I hear songs by The Eagles, I am flooded with memories of my early childhood summers spent on the beaches of southern California. I have many memories tied to music and I could go on, but that’s a whole other post. I’d like to talk about some things popping up in social media and news regarding Glenn Frey’s medications, and speculation of how it may have contributed to the cause of his death.

Patients like me, with chronic illnesses get mountains of advice from well-meaning friends and family encouraging us to walk away from science-based, researched treatment to more natural alternative treatments. alternative None of us were in the room with Glenn Frey and his family when he made treatment decisions, but chances are they carefully weighed the risks versus benefits. Like many patients, he risked illnesses because of a compromised immune system, and the many variables affecting any illness as it comes up.

My reason for writing this post is my concern about alternative treatment advocates, anti-vaxxers and supplement sales people, will use this press as a selling point for their useless products and sometimes dangerous advice. My message with this post is that there will always be someone selling hope. There will always be risk. Hell, the treatment I’ve been on since 2007, lists Lymphoma as a “side effect”. I get my blood work and monitor my health and continue my treatment because it has increased my mobility, stabilized my lung function and I am living well with my scleroderma. I no longer suffer. I have good and bad days like everyone, but suffering is not my way of life.

I urge patients to do their research. There is no “Google University”, and that many blogs quote other blogs as “proof” of their opinions and suggestions. Don’t listen to the Jenny McCarthys, because they are delusional self-important and ignorant.

Patients have to realistically weight risks versus benefits. Complications from illnesses like scleroderma, sarcoidosis or rheumatoid arthritis can hit us like a freight train, and if we’re not killed, we find ways to jump on and ride out the worst.