Scleroderma Awareness Month 2016

Scleroderma awareness is not all rubber bracelets and t-shirts. It’s about sharing and teaching others about the hard work being done for patients, providers and caregivers

Wednesday is the start of #scleroderma awareness month. There are different types of scleroderma; limited, morphea and diffuse. I refer to diffuse as “The Fast and The Furious” type, because most medical providers have little experience with scleroderma, many patients with diffuse scleroderma find out later in the disease process; which means it’s more likely to be fatal, faster. Kids can get scleroderma as well, forcing them into aggressive treatment on their young bodies. Awareness for the public is a great idea, in addition to the public, medical professionals need diagnostic training. The more physicians and nurses who recognize symptoms and signs, the better the chance of survival for scleroderma patients.

Thirty years ago, scleroderma was a death sentence. Even my diagnosis in 1994, most physicians I worked with did not believe I would live to see my 30th birthday. Here I am in my mid-forties. Make no mistake, scleroderma is a progressive, degenerative disease that hardens connective tissue, which is everywhere. I have fought to stay here by lifesaving treatments and hunkering down to survive the worst. I am only here because of the research done to treat the progression of scleroderma. Donate to research, provider education and patient education and support. You will save lives.

Unfortunately, I will be unable to attend the Scleroderma Foundation, Southern California Chapter walk this upcoming weekend. I will be working on a movie set, thanks to the hard work of those who work to improve lives of all patients living with a progressive degenerative disease. Life didn’t turn out how I planned, but life is good. (Does anyone’s life ever turn out exactly as planned?)

My secret is not a good attitude. (By the way, I hate that poster that the only disability is a bad attitude. It’s fluffy bullshit that makes people who aren’t disabled, feel better. See, my attitude is actually quite bitchy.) The number one reason why I am able to thrive, is because I got treatment for my depression. The chemicals in my brain, actually changed because of my depression. Depression is an unseen side effect of scleroderma. I learned to grieve for my losses and find purpose in my life. Not like some lofty help-the-planet kind of purpose, but reasons I want to be here. I don’t want to be a poster child for scleroderma. I did at one time, but now, no. I want to be known as a mom, sister, writer, comedian and dog love who happened to have scleroderma. I am not my scleroderma. No one is their scleroderma. >(Click to read about my experience with depression.)

    Please visit my blog page, The Mighty Turtle. I was diagnosed back in 1994. I began blogging in 2009. I am currently in a screenwriting mentor program, a stand-up comedian and soon, producer. Life is not over after a scleroderma diagnosis. Research is delaying death for many, but we have much more to do to help patients live with the disabilities caused by scleroderma as well as stop scleroderma from killing those who can’t stop it.