VA Secretary’s Comparison to Disneyland Is A Gift

And we’ll squander this gift on just the statement and not the ongoing problem with veterans care and benefits.

Take a look around you. (I will too, we’re in this together) How many veterans do we see? How do we know that person we see living on the street is not a veteran. How do we know that woman or man in front of us at the grocery store using her EBT card, is not a veteran?

Of course we Americans will say we support our veterans. How many of us give our time to visit veterans in the long term stay ward of the VA hospital? I don’t. Some of us do visit during the Christmas season, so we can click on our Facebook profile from 2013 and say: Look at this veteran I visited in the long-term ward of the veterans hospital. AND it’s a girl veteran. (True story.) I’m not talking about people who actually visit veterans and stay in the room long enough to have a meaningful conversation.

My point is, caring for The American Veteran is an idea, or wish by the American people and that’s about it. Not because we are all a**holes, but because maybe we are working hard to make ends meet and taking care of our families. The only time some of us may have to see the news, is the 30 minutes before Colbert and can barely stay awake for that.

I’m glad the VA secretary compared veterans wait times to waiting in line at Disneyland. Thank you, Mr. Secretary for a great conversation starter. Of course, journalists, pundits and viewers will squander this wonderful opportunity to discuss what’s going on with the Veterans Healthcare System, and argue over the comparison. Here is where I depart from we. If you’re focusing on the comparison only, you are part of the problem. There is something to his remark, and it can be an opportunity to do something about it. Look at the voting records of our presidential and congressional candidates. Use the anger or offense you may feel to take a look at the problem. We can keep changing the secretary and nothing will change, except the name that follows the word, secretary. I have been visiting Disneyland for over forty years and in the VA Healthcare System for twenty. This is a conversation. So, what can the we do about this besides buy more car magnets and complain?

I’m Not Here to Inspire You

The character Morpheus from The Matrix with a copation that reads, "What ifI told you that when you tell me you thought you were having a bad day, but then thought of me and realized my life is not so bad" Do you know that you are not helping?

Disability and illness are cruel, but having them does not make an individual special. This may not be a popular opinion, but it is mine. Since I have both disabilities and chronic illnesses, I will take the floor.

I have been called brave, a warrior, or described as “suffering”. I have had great difficulty helping people understand why these terms are used a little fast and loose for my taste.

I’m told often how courageous and brave people think I am. Really? I’m not brave because I live with an illness and disabilities. What’s the alternative? I’ve said it in prior posts that living with obstacles doesn’t make me brave; it just means I’m not dead. Being not dead is certainly a reason to celebrate, but it doesn’t make me brave. I’ve had conversations with people who say to me, “I was having a bad day, until I thought of you. I know that no matter how bad my day is, it couldn’t be as bad as yours. I have no reason to complain, your life sucks compared to mine. I mean really, I don’t know how you get out of bed every morning to face the day. I would probably kill myself if I were you.” (Every one of those statements have been said to me.)

Everyone should be able to have a bad day, and not feel guilty about it. On the surface, maybe “my life is not as bad as yours”, may sound like a compliment, or that your validating their struggle. No. That’s like saying, “My life is okay, but yours- it’s really bad. Oh my God, you have a terrible life. I am so happy not to be you. I feel so much better now, because my life could be so much worse!”

Having a disability or illness does not mean that my life sucks. Look, I would never say my illness is a gift. That’s stupid. But yes, my life is good. I am rare because I receive veterans disability benefits in addition to ordinary disability benefits. To be quite honest, I don’t know if I would have lived so long without it. Back before it was against the law to discriminate against pre-existing conditions, (and even now) patients who need specialized doctors outside their network of care will die prematurely because their budget doesn’t afford them the luxury to pay the out of pocket network co-pay, and/or non-formulary medication. The United State citizens fear terrorist attacks more than people dying from lack of needed specialized care and prevention. You know what’s frightening? The comparison of Americans who have died from terrorist attacks vs citizens dying due to lack of medical care. Citizens of our country think it’s okay to call people on disability lazy, and denying coverage because some a**hole commits fraud. And yes, there are things in place that prevent a disabled person from supplementing their income. Because if they do, and it gets over between $500-$800, they loose their benefits and suddenly it’s no longer supplemental. So when illnesses flare and they don’t have the resources to pay co-pays for specialists and medication. Suddenly, they’re worrying about rent and food. And don’t get me started on pain management. It has nothing to do with pain and everything to do with preventing addiction. We force people to wait months at a time to see pain specialists because doctors have restricted abilities to prescribe pain medication. Yes, addiction has to be in the equation somehow, but thanks to a generation of medical breakthroughs, but lack of access to treatment due to income made handing out pain medication like M&Ms a preferred treatment. I once paid $5.00 for a prescription for percocet and $50 for the antibiotic to cure the problem. If I had to choose between food for my kid or medication until payday, I’d hang in there with the Vicodin until payday. Now, the stigma of pain medication has become so bad, people will walk around in excruciating pain, than risk being labeled an addict. This is why people listen to Jenny McCarty and Food Babes of the world. They promise them health because in the past, treatment was not available.

We are so dumb as a species.

Wait, what were we talking about?

Using terms like brave, etc… People have asked me how I’m doing, and instead of embracing the exciting things I share with them, I will get, “Oh Karen, you are so brave. You don’t need to be brave for me. How do you really feel?”

I have been complimented on my strength to get out of bed and dress myself. I’ve been give credit for just showing up. People show up, every damn day.

I hate being called a scleroderma warrior. I am not at war with my body. I’m trying to make it strong and healthy. I want the organs of my body to work together so I can go out and do things. I think that makes me a negotiator, not a warrior. My body is not at war. My body is negotiating peace with factions who disagree with one another. It takes time, patience and work, but we all do it. As we age, we do things to prevent high blood pressure and diabetes. We stop eating fiend foods because our metabolism slows down. The things I do to stay healthy, are the same as anyone else. Sure, some the medications are different, but the intent is the same: We’re negotiating for more time on earth. We’re giving in to concessions like taking medication and avoiding chili dogs, to live longer. I don’t know about you guys, but I’m 45 and I am working to get at least another 50 years.

When people ask how I’m doing, I will tell them I feel good, and they won’t believe me. They’ll reply with statements like: ‘Oh you must really suffer”; “I know you’re suffering”. Are they listening? No.

I could say, “Today, I won the lottery, had sex with Chris Hemsworth and instead of breaking up, my boyfriend congratulated me.” And I bet I would still get, “Oh, you are so brave. I just don’t know how you do it.”

I have shared a video in this post of a TED Talk featuring Stella Young. She nails it. Please watch. She is far more entertaining than this post.

Scleroderma Project: Beneath The Surface, Should be Seen by Everyone.

 

The title of my last post is, “I Hate The Documentary, Project Scleroderma: Beneath The Surface”.  I thought about changing the title, but I have decided to keep it, and follow up with this post.  I take you on a scenic route to my point, so feel free to jump to the paragraph that is headed in bold type, for my point.    There is nothing simple about scleroderm.  Every patient is different.  

The documentary itself, is a labor of love by those who created it.     I have seen clips and is very well done.  This documentary

See Project Scleroderma. Learn about scleroderma and share link with friends.

is needed because it informs and educates.  What I may have failed to relay in the last post, is that in addition to my denial,  I hate the lack of education throughout the medical community.    And then there is the issue of  spell check here in this Word Press program, that insists on auto-correcting scleroderma to sclerosis.  I’ve been acutely ‘aware’ of scleroderma for over twenty years.  To say that I am beyond frustrated about how little people know about scleroderma, is an understatement.  Luckily there are people who care enough to donate their time and money to amplify the voices of those with scleroderma.

For twenty years, I have been raising so-called awareness.  Friends and family “like” my blog’s Facebook Page, but never share my posts.  I wouldn’t mind that so much if they weren’t so quick to share every Bible verse or “Save the Tatas” meme.  I haven’t had the guts to say this to friends and family, until now.

Dear Family and Friends,

Thank you for asking me how I’m doing and offering to help out, but I would really appreciate it if you would follow up with action like sharing things from my blog- or at least reading it.  These memes that you post like “Share if you agree cancer sucks”, seem nice.  But I think we can all agree you are sharing the obvious.  How about sharing something about an illness that few people know about like, oh I don’t know.. maybe scleroderma?  It’s great to see all your selfies at breast cancer runs and the swag you spent a ton of cash on, but when I post about fund raisers why is it so quiet?  Seriously all you have to do is share and donate a dollar when there are fundraisers.

There are many of you who do, but you know who you are.

XXOO

Karen

This post may be too honest, but it’s not like anyone reads my blog anyway.  I have avoided speaking out to friends and family on Facebook, because I don’t like to complain, and let’s face it:  More people have been affected by things like breast cancer.  But just because another disease gets more ink, that doesn’t mean I shouldn’t speak up every now and then and say: Ahem.. Over here please!

Yesterday, I posted about hating Project Scleroderma:  Beneath The Surface.  And if I can express my feelings about dreading to watch the documentary spearheaded by a woman who lost her mom to scleroderma within four months of her diagnosis, it would be irresponsible of me to be honest to strangers and not my friends, family or acquaintances.  What it boils down to, I hate having something no one else has heard of.   I hate that people share something every day about cancer or God, but rarely share about scleroderma.  I hate being a scleroderma patient.

Scleroderma: Beneath The Surface, will help spread the word about scleroderma.  Every day, I am reminded that there is very little publicity about scleroderma.  I was recently told by a customer service representative at the Social Security Disability office, that her understanding of scleroderma is that it’s a skin condition.   I wasn’t rude about it, but I did explain to her what scleroderma does to a human.  That it’s far more serious than a skin condition or rash.  She was shocked, and I was encouraged by her willingness to learn.  I was both encouraged and annoyed that someone who works with disabled Americans, thought scleroderma was just a skin condition.  Just thinking about it, makes my hair hurt.

Just because scleroderma doesn’t  have the coverage breast cancer “enjoys”, I do not want to diminish how serious breast cancer is, and how its publicity has saved lives.  Of course breast cancer continues to kill men and women and still there is so much to be done.     Many organizations have made progress because of generous donations.  What I see in addition to this great work, is a new industry, and that is something I am not fond of.

We don’t have to agree about everything, but we do agree scleroderma needs to be cured.
So many wonderful  Americans,  found ways to fund treatment for patients who could not get it, with fundraising.   That is a wonderful and selfless accomplishment.  And somehow, all of these good intentions have created the Disease and/or Cause market of swag.  We all love swag.  I don’t know about you, but swag that tells me I’ve done something good gives me a warm and fuzzy feeling.   Swag needs to be manufactured, marketed and sold.  Swag has become profitable when added to big named brands.   Do you really believe the National Football League would come out with all that Pink merchandise, if they did not profit from it?

I think it’s wonderful when communities come together.  Meanwhile, many individuals who belong to these communities, complain that giving all citizens access to healthcare, no matter what they could pay, is wrong because it’s socialism.  Now, before you stop reading this post because I do argue for universal healthcare for all in The United States, hear me out.

People have told me for years that I deserve the best, because I am a veteran.  I disagree.  I deserve the best because I am a human being.  I believe all who are in the United States should have access to the care they need, not what an insurance company or government program is willing to pay for that specific care.   Sure, I’m a veteran and I have scleroderma. But wouldn’t my family feel that I deserved the best possible care if I were not a veteran?  What if I was you daughter, sister, wife, mother or child?  Would you still feel that it would be okay that  I am denied treatment because I cannot pay for it?  I am also arguing is that veterans have friends and family,  they would like to see get the medical treatment they need.  (One, two, three, what are we really fighting for?) I have had access to the greatest treatment at the time, for scleroderma after fighting in both the VA system and private sector with what was nicknamed, Golden Insurance.

When things were going well for the business my ex-husband and I owned in the early 2000’s,  I chose the company’s health insurance plan.  Back then, no matter how much money my spouse made, no insurance company could provide the comprehensive coverage I needed, due to my pre-existing condition of scleroderma, unless I was employed.  So, I worked from home and chose such a comprehensive package for our company, it was one of the many reasons our company went bankrupt.  I already had access to great care at Loma Linda Veteran’s Hospital.  The Chief of Rheumatology told us that my prognosis was getting worse.  That if we had private insurance, he would recommend me to a colleague who just happened to be the Chief of Rheumatology at UCLA Medical center.  That admission of, “I don’t know what to do next, but I’m going to find someone who might”, saved my life.  I owe my life to this great rheumatologist who knew the difference between doing what’s best for his patient, and doing only what he could.  Of course, my ticket to the land of affordable second opinions, was money.  (That reads funny to me as well, and it’s not my grammar.)

If I did not have insurance, my rheumatologist could have referred me to the West Los Angeles VA, which could have taken months.  Meanwhile, Veteran’s health Care was overwhelmed with casualties returning from Iraq and Afghanistan.  The Veteran’s Healthcare system was already overcrowded and underfunded before two wars.  My yet to be diagnosed sarcoidosis was simply written off as a symptom of scleroderma, and nothing could be done.  So my appointment with a UCLA associated rheumatologist might have taken as long as a year to be seen.  My difficulty breathing was dismissed by local doctors and emergency departments in Murrieta and the Loma Linda VA hospital as a symptom of scleroderma.  I know this because these things were written in my medical records by whatever resident doctor in the Emergency Room was, who just happened to have little experience with scleroderma patients.  At UCLA, my biopsy was expedited because after my pulmonologist at UCLA reviewed several of my chest CT scans from other facilities, he read in the notes that I should have further testing for lymphoma.  Following the recommendations of the radiologist’s report of these scans, was a another note commenting the testing for lymphoma results was unnecessary because I had a pre-exisiting condition of scleroderma.  The pulmonologist at UCLA ordered a PET scan and the lymhnodes in my chest lit up like a Christmas tree on steroids.  There had to be a biopsy done, because everything pointed to cancer.  A biopsy of my lymph nodes and lungs were done less than two weeks later.  Granulaomas known as sarcoidosis, were found in my lymph nodes.  This discovery was huge.  My rheumatologist at UCLA ordered a medication that my Golden insurance company and Veteran’s Healthcare formulary, both required the failure of two other drugs before using Remicade.  So, my rheumatologist provided the golden insurance company evidence to support my need to skip right over the formulary, and allow for Remicade.  It took some time, but in less than six weeks, I received my first infusion of Remicade at my local hospital in Murrieta, not eighty-five miles away at UCLA.  The cost was $22,00o per infusion.  (Yes, that is a five-figure number for one dose of medication that by the way, saved my life.)

There is no way of knowing for sure if the Remicade stopped the scleroderma from hardening my lungs or the sarcoidosis from making my lymhnodes so large, I would be unable to get the proper amount of oxygen in my blood and my heart would fail.  What I do know is that eight years after my diagnosis of sarcodosis, I maintain a stable prognosis.    My treatment with a medication that was $22,000 a pop was transferred to the the Veteran’s Hospital at Loma Linda.  The rheumatologist who ordered it there, the Chief of Rheumatology presented evidence to counter the formulary restrictions, based not only what was provided to my Golden Insurance’s formulary, but my progress since the treatment began.

There is a continuity of care requirement for medications that are benefiting a patient when there is a change of insurance.  I was not able to stay on Remicade because simply because I was already on it.  There was a record the Golden Insurance company had, of the valid research backing this decision, and there was evidence that in my case, no matter what was being suppressed by this strong immunosuppressant, the drug was working.  At this time, there is no way to know of knowing what Remicade worked to fix.  I am one patient with both scleroderma and sarcoidosis.  Both chronic illnesses are rare and I have yet to know of another human with both.  My rhumatologist at UCLA, who is a leader in scleroderma treatment around the world, just recommended what he thought would be best, based on research that existed at the time and his experience.  (The world reference is not an understatement. My doctor is **Dr. Daniel Furst.  Go ahead.  Google him.  We’ll wait…)
But what does this have to do with a documentary about scleroderma?
I live in Southern California.  My location alone, allows me access to doctors who have experience with scleroderma, and/or who are actively overseeing and doing scleroderma research.  The Veteran’s Hospitals in highly populated areas like LA and Loma Linda are teaching hospitals where young minds go to learn and make progress in treatment and diagnoses because they are med students working with those who teach, do research and have mountains of experience and work, they can build upon to improve care.  Teaching hospitals are where progress in treatment are made, and save lives.   UCLA doctors and faculty are the specialists who see patients at the West LA VA.  Not everyone has as good an outcome as I have had.  I am aggressive when it comes to my care.  Being able to fight for my care, and get it, has a lot to do with my location.  If I lived in Bakersfield, I would have to drive, or take a bus provided by the VA, to see doctors at the West Los Angeles, VA.  Why do I know this?  Because there are not enough facilities for veterans to get the care and specialization they need in Bakersfield.  They travel to LA.  This is nothing unique.  When I lived in La Crosse, Wisconsin, I had to travel three hours by car, one-way to get the care I needed.  At one time, I lived across the street from a hospital that consulted with the Mayo Clinic.  Yet I still had to drive three hours one way to see a rheumatologist my VA Healthcare would cover.

Doctors need to be educated, and get the most current information and resources available to treat their patients.  Patients should not have to cut medication in half so they can get almost the right dose they need, to save an insurance company money.  In fact, insurance companies are the consumers to pharmaceutical companies.  The statement: “Cutting medication decreases the cost to the consumer”, is incomplete.  Sure, it does cut the cost to both patient and insurance company.  Production of medication using the same dosage, increases the profit a pharmaceutical company makes because it does not have to pay for the production costs of a smaller dose of the medication.  So we’re inconveniencing and sometimes hindering the care of  patients to save a buck.  Someone has to make a sacrifice, and it’s going to be a company who answers to shareholders.  The company or insurance company does not serve the consumer (patient).  It serves the bottom line and it’s shareholders.

From my perspective, medication is viewed as a luxury item, by those who don’t need it.  Medication is not a luxury item.  Medication extends, improves and saves the lives of We The People.  Should anyone be denied lifesaving treatment, simply because they cannot afford it?  No, but this has become The American Way.  Because providing healthcare to all that is paid for by the Federal Government would be socialist.  Yet aren’t we entitled to “Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness”?  No, because for some reason it has become the norm to deny people medical treatment they are unable to pay for, and allow them to die.  Wait, I know the reason.  It’s because we want the freedom not to pay for people less fortunate, like those who are sick and disabled, taking advantage of hardworking Americans.  People have limited access to treatment and qualified practitioners.  When something the government creates to help those who need medical care but can’t afford it, many companies who benefit by profiting on expensive medication, spend millions to stop expanding care to people who can’t afford care.  Not because they are cruel, but because it’s in the best interest of the shareholders.  A company cannot be cruel or compassionate.  It is a company and exists merely to earn a profit, no matter how helpful they appear.  (Companies are not people, my friends.)

Finally, my point:
Scleroderma Project:  Beneath The Surface, needs to be seen to show that swag is not what patients need.  Sure, swag is nice and don’t we all look good in pink or teal on Instagram at the most recent Race for The Cure?  I’m tired of swag.  I’m tired of merchandise.  Why is it that the disease with the best lobbyists gets all the funding for research?  I would love to see less people dressed in a color for their cause, and more money going straight to research for their cause.  I don’t hate the documentary itself.  I hate what the United States has become and that we need to show people suffering slow, painful deaths to prove that research for scleroderma needs funding, and is not simply a skin condition.  So download the movie, watch it then share a link to it and say a little something about it when you do.  The world needs to learn about scleroderma.  Watching and sharing is what you can do to help scleroderma patients like me.

Download Movie

 

** Dr. Furst educates rheumatologists around the world.  If you would like to find a doctor near you, please contact the Scleroderma Foundation by visiting Scleroderma.org  and you will find a doctor closest to you that has proper experience and education.  Dr. Furst works with my team of rheumatologsts who treat me through the VA.  This is because of my geographical location.  

Be sure to visit Project Scleroderma on Facebook and like their page along with Scleroderma Research Foundation and The Scleroderma Foundation.  Thank you!

 

Memorial Day 2013

What started as a Facebook status for Memorial Day, turned into something that I felt need more that just Facebook “status”.

Remember that “Supporting The Troops” means that we remember they are the very strongest of the “We The People”. That “WE” never be thought of as a “necessary casualty” without profound consideration of the consequences of putting “We” in harm’s way.

Remember that those who serve, take an oath to make the ultimate sacrifice and that by connection, those who risk losing them, silently take that oath as well. Willing or not.

Gravestones with flags planted on them for memorial day.

Remember the chaos when they return home. We must do better than empty promises and talking points.

Remember to never send any of “We”, into harm’s way without everything they foreseeable need.

Here are some things we can agree to pledge, if we believe this nation is “Under God”, or not:

Pledge that before we put those in harms way, that we have resources before they go, that would never force them to fight when they return.

Pledge to never again put those who serve in harm’s way, with talking points and patriotic phrases. If any reason to send others can fit on a bumper sticker, we need to get back to work.

Pledge to never forget things that were said, like, “Gas will be practically free, if we invade.” ANY country. We cannot forget that. We must remember, so it is never repeated.

This Memorial Day, remember our “Troops” are not just talking points, buzz words and bumper stickers. Let’s honor the fallen, by thinking before we act.  Always.

Everyone Deserves The Health Care Dick Cheney & I Have.

..”Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!” cries she

With silent lips. “Give me your tired, your poor,

Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,

The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.”

Emma Lazarus

Based on the cheers I heard about letting the uninsured die during the Tea Party Debate, I wonder if they would have led a protest against Emma Lazarus’ poem.

I mention Dick Cheney, because I saw that he was wearing his heart in his blazer due to the failure of his own heart. I have never liked the man. Yes, we have met. He wouldn’t remember. It was briefly while I was in the Navy. It’s no secret I’m not fond of him, but I would never wish his or anyone’s death.

I also mention him because many die of heart failure every year. How many are given an opportunity to have a portable, external pump 24/7? We’ll get back to that.

Let’s talk about my health care. In 1996, I had to fight for Veteran’s health benefits and won. I started in 1994 and I am one of the lucky ones. I wrote to my Representative in Washington and magically, I was 100% service connection disabled. (Thank you Representative of La Crosse, WI in 1996. I apologize for not remembering your name) When awarded my Veteran’s benefits, I called the VA and asked if the TV show, 20/20 would be knocking at my door to do an expose or something. After the government shut down of 1995, it was crazy times. To explain my benefits, here’s my latest post on Google Plus and Facebook.

“EVERYONE deserves the medical care I get. I will be at Rheumatolgy at the VA today to pick up my records for my Rheumatologist in LA. I remember every day how lucky I am. May everyone soon have socialized healthcare like me. I’m able to see the best specialists at UCLA because of Medicare. My specialists make recommendations to the VA, who actually sent me to UCLA because they didn’t know what to do with me. At the VA all my medications are covered. I am one of the lucky ones. Because of The VA and Medicare, my diseases are stabilized after 16 years, I have a good prognosis. EVERYONE should have access to such great care. EVERYONE. I served so I could go to college and get out of “Dodge”. The truth is, not everyone can serve, and their contributions are important. My uninsured friends are priceless. They deserve great care just as much as I do.”

So, why do Dick Cheney and I have health care, when so many others don’t? I feel as though we are the “storied pomp”, in Emma Lazarus’ poem, but we are not. Everyone deserves the health care we get. I am confident that if I have heart failure, I would fight my ass off to get a portable unit. Not because I can afford that, but because VA Hospitals are teaching hospitals. You get fresh minds mixed with the brilliant experience and knowledge of the residents. I have seen many cases and experienced first hand care where money is not a factor. I would be careless to not mention they do have a medication formulary, but I have found ways around that to get what I need- and I’m happy to share how if anyone needs it.

So why does Dick Cheney get a heart pump and I get infusions without having to try two other medications and have them fail before I get my beloved Remicade?

I could speculate and make jokes, but I honestly have no idea. I have felt massive amounts of guilt watching friends and family try to make it without insurance. We are Americans- we’re supposed to be the good guys. I grew up believing we stand for and with others who can’t do it on their own. If I were Karen, the manicurist, I would’ve died in child birth because I wouldn’t have had my magic letter. That’s right, a magic letter.

When I was pregnant in 2003-04, the VA did and still does not deliver babies. I received a letter in the mail that stated something like, “The VA will pay for all medical care related to the health of this veteran regarding her current condition.” When my blood pressure had become so high that I began to see orange spots, my OB/GYN sent me to Mary Birch Hospital in San Diego. Seventy two hours later, after shots of steroids and my organs began to fail, my son was delivered by C-section.

There is too much to that story to include all the details in this entry, but two things stick out.

1. I shared a semi private room with a woman my age in the same condition. Both of us were given steroid injections. After my 1st painful injection, I asked the nurse to put it in my IV. The next round of shots came and it was done. No question asked. I told my roommate to ask for the same. She did. They told her her insurance wouldn’t allow it. (record scratch stop) Yes, a woman who needed to be kept calm because her blood pressure was dangerously high, had to be put through frequent painful injections. Imagine sitting in comfort while listening to someone cry because they are in so much pain- that could have been avoided. Did I deserve better treatment? No. I had the equivalent of a blank check. What Karen needed, Karen got. Meanwhile, my equal in the room next to me had to suffer because some asshole paper pusher decided she didn’t need to feel comfortable. She could endure that pain. Both of us had HELLP Syndrome.

2. Three years later, I was in an emergency room at a public hospital, not a VA hospital because my ex-husband and I had a business. I was in charge of picking insurance our family and employees. I heard more than one doctor call it “Golden Insurance”. It’s what got me in the door at UCLA and medicare makes it possible for me to keep going back to UCLA.

In the ER, the nurse assigned to me, shared her own experience with HELLP Syndrome. She had the exact symptoms I had, without the happy ending. Her insurance required her husband to drive her an extra hour after going completely blind because of her blood pressure while she was pregnant. The ER they were assigned was not equipped to handle her condition. She lost her baby. She continues to work as a nurse to keep her family insured. She has to, to stay alive. She needs heart medication and frequent treatment by a cardiologist. I couldn’t say it, but all I could think was how unfair it was. Life is not supposed to be fair, but no one should be denied the care they need because of money. NO ONE. She lost her baby at 32 weeks and was in the ground, while my son- also born at 32 weeks, was at home getting ready to go camping.

So, I ask again, are Dick Cheney and I of more value than those two women above? Are we worth more than my friend Chelle? Are we worth more than Steph and Jennifer, Chelle mentions in the video below? No. But if I were Karen; the manicurist and he Dick; the retired electrician we would be both be dead.

Make time to watch Chelle’s video.

Thank you.