Scleroderma is an autoimmune disease.  Healthy cells are mistaken for unhealthy ones, and the body attacks itself.  Not only is scleroderma a difficult name to remember, it is also a Greek word that means: hard skin.  Because of the name, people mistake scleroderma for a skin condition.

When a doctor told a patient that he or she had scleroderma, it was usually followed by a statement like: Get you’re things in order, you don’t have long.  For a long time, that was true.  Now, thanks to research, there are treatments available to help patients survive the progression of scleroderma by treating a patient’s symptoms.  Scleroderma is different with every patient.  Some have Diffuse Scleroderma or the “fast and furious killer”, or Limited Scleroderma, which progresses slowly and in spurts.  Many patients die of complications of this type.  Then, there is the overlap kind.  In addition to scleroderma, a patient  can have  another autoimmune disease like Lupus, Fibromyalgia and any of the dozens of other autoimmune diseases that manifest slowly.  Often not receiving the proper diagnosis because symptoms have not yet appeared, or the patient’s medical team does not know enough about autoimmune diseases to diagnose properly.  Often resulting in the Limbo of illness: Mixed Connective Tissue Disease, or MCTD.

I was diagnosed in 1994, at the Madison Veteran’s Hospital.  The Veteran’s Healthcare System was originally  designed for aging men.  So not only did my medical team have limited research about scleroderma at the time, I was a woman and they really had to work hard to make changes to accommodate my treatment.  They did not know I should have immediately been placed in an occupational therapy program to prevent my hands from becoming severely damaged and impaired.   They did not know to inform me about symptoms and warning to watch for, so I didn’t have to loose part of my thumb.  They didn’t know that my additional symptoms were really sarcoidosis, and not scleroderma symptoms, proven by an outside provider after taking months of ER chest CT scans to UCLA’s pulmonology department, three hours away paid for out of my own pocket and private insurance I could only receive at the time because my husband and I owned a small business, and as an employee could not be turned down because of pre-existing conditions.  Yes, many people I met in the 1990′s are surprised to still see me alive.

Now that denying insurance coverage because of pre-existing conditions is now against the law, patients with scleroderma are receiving life-saving and life-extending treatment, but many patients in areas that are not near a major city like Los Angeles, Chicago and Minneapolis, patients are still getting misdiagnosed and dying because of it.  How do we solve this problem?  With medical provider education and patient education.  Of course, money is the biggest help because that funds research and treatment.  All of these things are happening, but we can do so much more.  Scleroderma needs better marketing.

T-shirts and teal bracelets are not enough.  A pretty color, a shirt  and accessories is not enough.  Scleroderma needs a new name and  I have the perfect name.  One that embodies the surprise of the uncommon scleroderma symptoms. A name that expresses the pure frustration of scleroderma patients, in addition to the terror they feel when they experience trouble doing something we all do without thinking; like swallowing and breathing.  I think you will agree this name, fits.

Scleroderma needs to be renamed, “Whisky-Tango-Foxtrot”.

It’s easier to say, easier to remember and let’s face it, you can’t forget it.  It’s obvious why, but I’ll explain it in one simple sentence. It’s easier to Tango or Foxtrot after some whiskey.  (By the way, did you know there are two ways to spell whisky?)   Not everyone likes whiskey, but who doesn’t like dancing, or watching someone dance?  See how easy that is?  Whiskey Tango Foxtrot.  Rolls right off the tongue.  So let’s not just raise awareness, let’s educate and get the word out about this debilitating, progressive  and degenerative disease called scleroderma and rename it Whiskey Tango Foxtrot.  Because I know when I first heard the word scleroderma the first thing I said was, “sclero-what?”.  End sclero-what today, because the best way I know how to express what scleroderma has made me think of the most is, “WTF?”

 

Scleroderma

What did you think of when you first heard scleroderma? This sums it up for me

 

        
Scleroderma is a chronic illness it oesn't make me a hero.

 

 

 

As a scleroderma patient, there are things I cannot control, but as a strong-willed control freak, I happily manage to control a thing or three.  

Recently, Facebook banned a photo of a woman with scleroderma, next to another scleroderma patient who did not look like she had scleroderma.  She did it to show just how different scleroderma affects each and every patient.  Since Facebook banned the pictures, she has encouraged scleroderma patients to share pictures without make-up.  I love this.  It’s a bold step into the limelight for many patients who wear make-up and long sleeves to avoid the stares from strangers.  After twenty years of hiding changes to my body, I am not ready to step into the patient limelight.  Why?  Am I chicken-sh*t?  Not necessarily.  Hear me out…

I admire patients who step out into public with their teal shirts answer questions and enduring the stares.  It’s not that I don’t want to talk about it and educate others about scleroderma and what they can do, because I’ve been doing it for twenty years.  I just want to do it in controlled settings.  For example, I won’t leave my apartment without wearing make-up, and something with sleeves that will minimize the appearance of my hands.  No, it is not because I’m ashamed.  It is because I don’t want to be stared at, or begin talking to strangers about my very personal medical care.  In the 1990′s I would tell people about scleroderma to anyone who would listen.  I would show them my hands, explain my care if they asked about it.  I guess in a way, I am burned out on the person to person explanation of what I have, what I do and how I cope.  Now, I have a blog with years of my personal experiences.  Anyone can access it.  Of course I want to meet new people, but not to talk about a medical condition that has caused me to spend years of my life dealing with my medical treatment.

Let me put it another way; taking care of my health is my job.  It’s my forty-plus hour a week job.  For those of you that work forty hours a week, would you like to discuss what you do every time you go to the grocery store?  Look, I know scleroderma patients need awareness.  I just choose to do it my way with the written words of my blog, and getting out and doing things not related to scleroderma.

At first, I thought I was a coward.  Why hide?  Why won’t I step into the limelight and show the damage sceroderma has done to my hands and face?  Some of you who follow my blog are familiar with my “vanity”.  I place vanity in quotations, because what some perceive my actions as vain, is not.  Do you want to know why I refuse to be photographed without make-up and un-tag myself  or ask to have my picture taken down for reasons only I understand?  Because I do not want to be remembered for having scleroderma.  I know, it doesn’t sound nice, but it’s my truth.  I’m not making excuses, I’m sharing because I can’t be the only scleroderma patient who feels this way.  When I die in fifty years of old-age, I do not want to be memorialized on a website that talks about my fight against scleroderma.  I want to be remembered for my sense of humor and my amazing son who will grow up to do things to make the world a better place..  When I die, I do not want anyone to say, “we lost another sclero-warrior”;  Or that I’m now a “sclero-angel”.  I just don’t.

Is this a severe case of denial?  Am I  oblivious to the possibility that the progressive, degenerative course of sarcoidosis I have in addition to the scleroderma?  I’m not oblivious to it.  I just don’t care to think about it.  Not because I have a choice not to think about it.  With every doctor’s visit I think about the fibrosis and granulomas, plotting to kill or disable me.  When I don’t need to be focused on it, I just don’t.

And there’s the argument that, “Karen, the pain of scleroderma doesn’t allow many patients not to think about it.”
Yes, that’s true.  I have experienced days and weeks at a time where I was in constant pain as my body hardened.  I used to ask for it to stop, until there came a point in my progression that in order for scleroderma to stop,  I would need to die.  I just accepted that scleroderma would stop when I die.  Then, I tried to figure out how to live while this was happening.

Right now, I have a stable prognosis.  At one time, we thought scleroderma may have run it’s course, but it hasn’t.  It’s going, and right now, it’s not going to kill me.  So right now, I have to live.  And yes, I want to blend and be not all about scleroderma all the time.  I realized I needed to control how I share my experiences when a woman with damage to her hands by rheumatoid arthritis cornered me at The Comedy Store and fondled my hands in disbelief and crying while I politely tried to squirm away from her.  Just because I share my story does not mean I have to stand there while someone looks at me and cries.  I am not there to comfort them and tell them everything is going to be alright.  I cannot be expected to do that, unless I am in a setting that gives permission to that.  That includes comedy clubs, Starbucks grocery stores and anyplace I happen to be.  I cannot tell other people I suffer, because I have the luxury of convincing myself that I do not suffer.  Honestly, I don’t believe I’m suffering.  There are times I do suffer, but the word suffering implies that I am constantly suffering.  I get frustrated often.  Sometimes, I’m in pain, but I cannot say to anyone that “I suffer from scleroderma”.  When I hear that phrase, I hear, “scleroderma runs your life”.  Yeah, in some ways it does, but I refuse to grant scleroderma that power in words and deeds.

Is that denial?  No, it is not.  I used to think I was in deep denial, but it is acceptance.  That’s it.  I control what I can.  If I want to get up in the morning and go get coffee, it takes me 120 seconds to slap on some make-up before I step out the door.  Not because I’m ashamed, but because I don’t want to draw attention to myself.  Of course people shouldn’t stare, but they do.  Not because they are a***oles, but because they are human.  One reason human beings are here today is because of our pattern recognition.  When we see something that falls out of the patterns we are used to, we are naturally curious, and curiosity results in stares and questions.  Kind of in the way a celebrity will wear sunglasses or a hat.  They just want to get a cup of coffee, and relax.  So, if you’re a patient who doesn’t wish to be called a sclero-warrior and be referred to as a sclero-angel after death, that’s okay.  Not because I say so.  It just is.  We don’t have to wear teal, or those damned bracelets of any color.  We can educate people how we wish to, and not have to be thought of as suffering, or as heroic.  Living with a chronic illness does not make us heroes.  Living with a chronic illness just makes us not dead.  How we choose to cope with it is our business.  We don’t have an obligation to walk around like teal billboards, unless we wish to.  And it we don’t wish to, that’s okay.  Because those who do, are no better or stronger than we are.  The just cope and share differently.  Of course its admirable, but I refuse to feel badly because I don’t share 24/7.  I do what I can.  Some do more, some do less, but we all do what we can.

        

Laugh At What Scares You

By Karen | Filed in Sarcoidosis, Scleroderma
horsemen

Some of you may already know I started  doing stand-up comedy in 2013.  When I began, I did not want to be the #scleroderma comedian; but because it’s a big part of my story, I have to talk about it the only way I know how, by making fun of it.  And honestly, my adventures in veteran’s hospitals, medical facilities and dating provides a ton of original material.  But I still do not want to be the scleroderma comedian, and that is possible.  Because within these adventures, are stories everyone can relate to in relationships, rejection, disappointment and hope.  So, that’s my story.

This weekend, is the Scleroderma Education Conference in Tennessee.  I’m creating memes based on things I’ve said over the past 20 years.  I normally don’t upload a bunch of pics to Instagram at once, but with the conference, it seems like a good time to post some.  You can find them on Instagram @karenOvasquez.  I will be posting dates of upcoming shows on my comedian page on Facebook.  My humor is PG-13, so except for instgram I keep the blog and comedy seperate.

I have been posting here about once a month.  There are so many great scleroderma blogs out there, check out my blogroll for the ones I follow.

About the tag #LaughAtWhatScaresYou it’s just that:  Something that breaks the tension when things seem scary or a great way to teach others.  It’s something for not just #scleroderma & #sarcoidosis patients to share.  It’s for everyone to share.  Don’t worry, I won’t be starting a foundation or patient group.  There are plenty to choose from and I’m not into commitment.

So please, follow the links and check out the tags.  Share what you feel is worthy.

Thanks! -Karen

 

        

World Scleroderma Day 2015

By Karen | Filed in Scleroderma, Uncategorized

Note:  If you haven’t seen the Wayne Brady episode of Chappelle’s Show, you won’t get the reference below.  (Watch Now)

 

Every year, tens of thousands of patients around the world, get together on social media to inform the masses of scleroderma.  What is scleroderma?  Scleroderma is a progressive, degenerative disease like Lupus, rheumatoid arthritis and … marriage.

We have come a long way in research.  Scleroderma patients are living longer, thanks to the hard work of researches, patient advocates and doctors around the world dedicated to helping scleroderma patients live longer, fulfilling lives.  Unfortunately, that is still a minority of patients.

There was a time that when a doctor said to a patient, ” You have scleroderma”, and it was followed by, “Get your affairs in order.”  Scleroderma was a death sentence.  Things have improved for patients, but I’m not going blow smoke up your a** and tell you it’s all unicorns and rainbows, because it’s not.  Unless by rainbow you mean an arch of shades of brown in the sky to warn you of the sh*t-storm ahead ( an anti-rainbow, if you will); and by unicorn, you mean one of the Four Horseman of The Apocalypse proclaiming,”Taste the rainbow, bitches. ”

Scleroderma is considered an Orphan Disease.  300,000 Americans have the disease.  To me, it’s less an “orphan” and more of a “Son of a Bitch”.   There is no cure.   Patients meet with their doctors, and weigh the options of taking medications with side effects that include lymphoma or sudden death versus, not taking medication.  The cure sounds worse than the disease, doesn’t it?  Well, risking sudden death and cancer to get medicine to stop the progression of scleroderma, is usually the better choice.  Yes, scleroderma is that bad.

It’s hard to explain what scleroderma does, that causes my body’s immune system to attack itself, but this is what I think it would go down:  It would be like being driven around by Wayne Brady.

I’m in the back seat  of a car, and see Wayne Brady driving and a frightened Dave Chappelle in the passenger’s seat.  Wayne Brady stops the car abruptly, orders us out of the car, gives us spiked baseball bats, points to what he wants to destroy, and we do it, because Wayne Brady is one scary m*ther f**ker.  Then we get back in the car and drive until Wayne Brady sees another spot of town he wants destroyed,. Dave Chappelle and I are ordered out of the car by a screaming Wayne Brady.   At one point, he asks Dave Chappelle and I, if he, and I quote, has “ to choke a bitch.”  

So on July 1st, the teal of scleroderma awareness will fade into the next cause’s color, but not for scleroderma patients and those who love them.  . I understand that scleroderma is not the only progressive, deadly disease out there that needs to be cured, but since you’re here right now, take the time to learn about it by following the links, and sharing what you know.

Scleroderma Research Foundation

 Scleroderma Foundation

Bounce to a Cure

 

 

 

 

If you are “lucky” enough to have the kind of scleroderma that progresses quickly

 

        

How I Don’t Look Sick

By Karen | Filed in Scleroderma

Well, at least I think I don’t look sick, or like I have scleroderma.  

I read my dear friend Chris Dean’s  blog this morning and I was so excited to read she was trying out products. I told her so, and she encouraged me to post about my make-up tips.   In the past fifteen years, I have spent thousands of dollars on products I have thrown away.  I finally got wise to return policies.  That helps, but nothing- I mean NOTHING works as well as samples and trying it out yourself.  Well, except someone who is trying products and posting pictures without make-up.  My friend Chris is doing this.  She looks beautiful with and without make-up.  I thought about posting my before and after, and I won’t.  It’s not that I don’t have the self esteem.  I do.  I just hate seeing myself in pictures without make-up.

Before 1996, I never wore foundation.  Just eye shadow, blush, eyeliner, mascara and lip gloss.  Okay, maybe mascara if it were a special occasion.  Now, I set aside at least thirty minutes every day, to cover the damage from scleroderma.  My lips have become smaller, thanks to my scleroderma face-lift. (That’s the scleroderma free gift with purchase.)  And now that I have decided to pursue writing and stand-up comedy, I have found a way to get big lashes, without wearing fake ones.

I don’t think I was “the hot chick”, but I did once cause an accident while in my bikini walking to the bus stop on PCH in Huntington Beach.  before scleroderma, I didn’t mind posing for pictures, I would even photobomb.  Then, scleroderma struck.  My face began to change.  I began to notice this change in 1996, and that is when I began my search for a long lasting foundation.

My pigment began to be darker in some places, and lighter in others.  I’m Italian and Spanish, so I can tan.  Then I began to tan on parts of my face, and hands.  The way it looked  reminded me of an animal print.  Leopard, to be specific.   At the time, I worked in the shoe department in a large department store in La Crosse, Wisconsin.  I had a friend at the Estee Lauder counter.  My sister, worked at Clinique in South Bend.  So, luckily, I had a lot of help.  This was before Estee Lauder’s Double Wear.  Their foundation worked well for my skin, but it did not stay on as long as I needed.  Then, thanks to my sister, I found Clinique’s Work Out Make-Up foundation.  They have a comparable formula now,   At the time, I had no broken blood vessel damage.  It was simply a pigment issue.

My biggest problem with make-up wasn’t which formula I could use.  It was how I applied it.  At the time, I had ulcers on six finger tips.  I could not use my finger tips. to apply foundation evenly.  I didn’t really master brushes with liquid make-up, until recently, so I used make-up sponges.  They were fabulous!  The only problem was, they were disposable, and they sucked up product.  So not only was I spending even more on foundation, I was creating waste.  There has to be at least one landfill of sponges that were mine.  Just another lane on my highway to hell.

Finally, I figured out that concealer as foundation, in some cases, works best for me.  It gives the coverage I need on darker spots, and I can make my face lighter or darker with power foundation and bronze.  But it still had it’s problems. I hadn’t considered photographs.

In 1998, I was married.  Most of the wedding pictures taken with personal cameras turned out great.  Then we picked up wedding album from the photographer.  No one really thought of it as a flaw I guess, but me.  The kind of make-up I used, picked up the light from flashes.  I had that mask look in many of the pictures.  I guess the photographer thought that was how I looked?  No, the truth was, I did not see me, when I looked at my pictures and cried in the car.    I saw someone with scleroderma and I wanted nothing to do with it.  That’s a whole other post, let’s get back to the make-up, because there is a fix for that.

When I don’t wear make-up, I look very sick.  I have telangectasia damage all over my face, and my pigment is very inconsistent. The only time I don’t wear make-up, is if I am going to the emergency room.  Because I look like I have broken out with something, and it moves things along faster.  I have gone to the doctor for check-ups, routine check-ups with nothing wrong feeling great and if I’m not wearing make-up, I get comments about how sick I look.  I could be in yoga pants, bouncing off the walls with happiness after a hike, but if I’m not in make-up, I get comments like, “Oh you poor thing”, etc…

So, thanks to the help I get at Sephora and their amazing staff, (Hello both Temecula locations and JC Penny Glendale!) I have found a few things that have worked for me.  I need to switch foundations when my skin is dryer, but I’m going to tell you what I’m using right now.  Again, you can probably find less expensive alternatives if you can use your fingertips for application.  I took these products right out of the drawer in my bathroom.

Nars Bronzer, Kat Von D Lock-it Featherweight Primer, Make Up Forever HD High Definition Foundation, Kat Von D Lock-it Tattoo Powder Foundation, Sephora Brushes 45, 57 & 55

Karen’s Foundation Routine

  1. Kat Von D Lock-it Featherweight Primer.  After moisturizing, I put this on before applying my eye-make up.  It gives the primer time to set up.  Unlike eye make-up primer, foundation primer needs to sit.  It takes me about 15 minutes to do my eyes on a night I have a show.  So a minute or two to set is fine.  If I don’t use primer with any foundation, it doesn’t last as long. I also notice I use less foundation.  I do apply this with the side of my fingers because it doesn’t need to be layered and buffed like foundation.
  2. Make-up Forever.  I just switched to this one week ago.   I was wearing Kat Von D’s concealer, medium 24.  I just preferred the concealer color to Kat Von D’s Foundation (liquid) that matched my tone.  I switched to Make-up Forever.   The color match was better for me.  Both formulas are easy to work with.  Kat Von D is famous for tattoo cover up.  That stuff works.  Yes, I don’t change primers when I switch foundations.  You don’ t have to buy a whole new bottle. I’m sticking with Kat Von D.  I always keep Smashbox’s green primer if I run out of primer.  Not because I love Smashbox.  It’s because I bought it, I wasn’t crazy about it and I bought it from Ulta and I lost the receipt.  It’s great to use if I run out of primer as my back-up.   What matters most, is what helps you, not me.  I’m probably belaboring this point.  I’m fiercely loyal when I find products and if I like working with the people who sell them.  For  full disclosure, I drive 87 miles, one way to get my hair done.  It’s absolutely worth it to me.  Shop where you feel is best for you, and worth your time.
    Okay, back to my routine:
    I apply my foundation with Sephora’s #45 brush.  It used to be called “Mineral Powder” and something in French.  Someone figured out that it can apply heavy and buff out well for even coverage.  (I figured it out first.) Because the red is so dark, it takes layers of foundation, with this brush, I can do it in one layer.
  3. Kat Von D’s Medium 52 Foundation Powder.    I love this stuff.  If I didn’t need to layer so much, I would just wear this. I do a light dusting over my foundation.  I use Sephora’s #55 brush.  I would love to have one of Kat Von D’s Brushes, but I already had these and buying another brush was not in the budget.
  4. Nars Bronzer.  I just love Nars colors and quality.  I use it as a blush and bronzer.  I also apply this to my neck and up my chin line to even get rid of that pesky chin line.  My bronzer is ver close to my natural all-over skin tone.  Not everyone needs it.  If you don;t use bronzer, be sure to smooth out that chin line with a powder.
  5. Kat Von D’s Lock N Load Makeup Setting Mist.  This stuff is the shiznit.  I set my layers with this, then let it dry.  I keep it in my purse in to prevent my skin from drying out during the day.   My skin is dry, and if I’m at event where there will be photographs, I wear a little heavier concealer.  A little spray once during the day, keeps everything set.
It doesn’t matter where you get your make-up.  What matters is what works for you.  Start with the inexpensive stuff.  Just make sure you check their return policy.  I have returned opened make-up to Target, Walmart & Sephora.  Macy’s and large department stores have good policies as well.  Don’t use it like a library, be reasonable.  They can refuse your return if you abuse it.  But  these stores have a large enough variety of products and inventory, they are able to do that because they know they will keep your business from other departments.  I know Target now has a make up artist in their cosmetics department.  I have worked with two, and they were helpful and recommended great products and tips.  Now that I know what I need, I use Sephora.  I love their staff.  And I get a birthday gift every year.  The points are great too.  I have to replace mascara every two months and if I don’t have a show coming up, the free gifts with my points are a great way to stock up on travel size items and try some of their higher end skin care skin.  And if you can, go in the store with your dad.  We dropped into Sephora so he could pick up some cologne.  He told me to pick anything out I wanted and he’d treat.  I think he saw me as the 13 year-old Karen.  The 43 year-old Karen, picked out the Murad Advanced Radiance Serum.  He was not expecting it to cost $150.00.  Looking back, I probably should have bought two.

I hope that was helpful.  Questions? Post them in the comments.

 

 

        

June is Scleroderma Awareness Month

By Karen | Filed in Scleroderma

 

a·ware·ness

əˈwernəs/

noun
  1. knowledge or perception of a situation or fact.
    “we need to raise public awareness of the issue”
    • concern about and well-informed interest in a particular situation or development.
      “a growing environmental awareness” – GOOGLE

There were 27 diseases that had an awareness month in May. There are 13 in June on the list, but there are at least three missing that I know about.  Truth is, there are not enough colors to represent the amount of diseases that need cures. In July, scleroderma patients will watch the T-shirt colors change like the leaves in autumn.

Every store I go to, asks if I would like to make a donation to whatever cause they are fundraising.  Their causes are no less valid, but like many, I decline donating with a guilty tone in my voice.

People will say things to me like, “I could never be as strong as you are.”, about how I deal with obstacles they can only imagine.  We all have obstacles to overcome.  They are as different as night and day, but they are obstacles.  Of course people are as strong as I am.  Maybe they have not yet been tested, or maybe their coping skills are much different, but there is no “better”.

It has been said to me that, “at least you don’t have cancer.”  Maybe.  Maybe not.  There are treatments for cancer that are already mainstream.  There are an increasing number of options for Scleroderma treatment, but like many illnesses, things are tried based on how they work with other illnesses.  For example:  Most scleroderma treatment suppresses the immune system, to slow down progression, called immunosuppression.  The medications used for immunosuppression are also used in treatment of cancer and organ transplant recipients.

You and I are both aware of scleroderma.  It’s not enough to wear teal and do a fundraiser, but it helps.  Non-profit organizations that conduct research compete with other non-profits.  Not out right, but think about it; they are competing.  People donate money to a campaign they care about.  If it’s not someone they love, those organizations have to advertise to get donations.  It’s not good or bad, it just is.  I am more likely to donate to scleroderma research than cancer.  I am also more likely to donate to The March of Dimes, because their work directly effected the outcome of my pregnancy and saved the life of my son and I.  Just like everyone else, I donate to causes that matter to me.  Yet I can still become absolutely furious in October because the world turns pink.  The money used for merchandise could be put towards research and assistant programs.  But without merchandise, people won’t donate.  We like to feel good about doing something, and nothing seems to make us feel better than wearing something that tells the world we did something.  I do it.  You do it.  It’s very American.

Now, after 21 years since my initial diagnosis, and 25 years after onset of symptoms, I’m still here. My hands have contracted, I’ve lost range of motion in parts of my body and my lungs are scarred. I’m still here, and functioning very well. As irritated as I get about merchandise, I would not be here.  That merchandise has funded research that has saved my life and will save the lives of many more. I am taking medications now, that had I been diagnosed today, would have saved my hands, or at least the tissue that was destroyed by severe raynaud’s phenomenon.  I hate awareness, but without it, I’d be dead.  Awareness inspires action.  Please do something this month to teach others about scleroderma.  Thank you. -K

 

 

 

        

Time Flies

By Karen | Filed in Scleroderma

I can’t believe it’s been so long since I have posted.  I have been writing posts, but they have been a bit angry.  You see, I prefer not to talk about having scleroderma, or living with it.  I prefer to write about it, but then I get on stage and make fun of it.

I recently told a fellow scleroderma patient on FaceBook, that I don’t think of scleroderma as a terminal disease.  After reading it, I felt like an a**hole, but I guess denying the death part, helps me get through living with it for so long.

For years, I was in pain.  I kept asking for it to be over.  Then I realized scleroderma would be gone when I’m dead.  I rather enjoy being not dead, but who doesn’t?

Then I see patients who are dying wearing oxygen canula, and I think to myself, “I’d rather die than do that.”  Then, I remember the people who love me and I wonder what I would really do.  I talk a good game.  I don’t think I would have the ovaries (or balls) to live with major obstacles that would make me walk slow, or have someone else help me.  Well, I could walk slow, but I couldn’t live with someone who took care of me.  I’d have to have someone help me, but not be my friend.  I once had a caregiver help me, when I got out of the hospital last year.  I had her stop coming because her uniform and face, represented my need to ask for help.

I think that I could not so those things other patients do, to stay alive.  Then I remember that I hate it when people tell me that they aren’t as strong as I am, and they couldn’t hack scleroderma.  When someone tells me that, in my head I hear a voice that says, “Bitch, please.  A trained monkey could do what I do, with the resources I have.”

Now, I’m the person saying to the scleroderma patient, “I couldn’t do what you do.”

We never know how really strong we are, when we are face to face with a challenge.  I will still continue to believe that I’m not terminal, because I’m not.  But I will stop thinking to myself that I would rather die than need and ask for, help.  Okay, you and I both know that’s bulls**t; but I will stop thinking to myself that I would rather die than ask for help with my activities of daily living… for five minutes.  Maybe I will think about it for five minutes once a day, but don’t rush me.  I’ve got other things to do, not related to scleroderma.

        

Yes.  Scleroderma does do ugly things to beautiful people, and me, too.

Photo by comedian Brendan Cooney, co-host of The Bunny Ranch at Karma Lounge. Yes, I am wearing yoga pants.

When I began this blog, my intention was to raise awareness of scleroderma.  I’m going on my sixth year with this blog, and awareness is not enough.  The truth is, scleroderma is an ugly disease.  It doesn’t directly affect breasts, and the damage done by scleroderma is shocking to those who are completely unaware.   I know, no one wants to hear that people aren’t paying attention because there is no high-level celebrity that has it, except Queen Latifah’s mom.  Here are some things not being covered, even by foundations.  Not because they don’t want to, but because they are too busy researching and assisting patients and their families.

There are so many things that bother me about awareness campaigns.  First, small independent patient communities, not affiliated with research or patient advocacy, raising money for swag to fund their advertising which includes a bunch of prayers and stupid bracelets.  I’ve had scleroderma for twenty-one years and not once has a stupid bracelet made me feel better.  How about skipping the middle man and sending that two bucks you paid to look like you made a donation or care about scleroderma, directly to research or patient advocacy.  Or maybe something like a scleroderma patient’s cleaning service.

Unless you are dying or rich, scleroderma patients do not qualify for cleaning services, without having a home health nurse.  Don’t get me wrong, many patients need full time care.  But for those who don’t, like me, the last thing I want in my house is someone dressed like a nurse, who has to stay for three hours twice a week, cleans my house half-assed because she’s there for healthcare and of course hear about all her personal problems (I’ve had this done with three “helpers”.)  The last time, when I was released from the hospital after forty-five days last year, the VA granted a home health care assistant.   Eventually,I had to schedule myself to be home three hours, twice a week so she could help me clean.  Of course, she was there for healthcare so getting her to clean was like pulling teeth, so that didn’t last long and I resumed my own cleaning. All I needed was someone to come by once a week for an hour and a half and do the heavy cleaning in my house, then get the f*ck out.  I didn’t need companionship, help dressing, eating, bathing, even though I had to stay off my foot.  Just clean the bathroom, kitchen floors, change my sheets, not even do laundry.  But no, the VA doesn’t do that.  Everyone is so busy looking for fraud, that people who could use a little help now and then have to wait until they are injured, or worse.

And then there are people who tell me, “ask your family to help.”  First of all, I live near none of my family.  I live near a health care facility qualified to take care of my medical needs.  Also, that would require me to live near my family.  One family member even told me I should try assisted living.   I get home from comedy clubs at two or three in the morning, and I drive myself.  Look I may have stayed in the hospital forty-five days, but I did not go without a booty call.  I had two during my stay. I got away with it in a hospital, because nursing stations are busy at shift change, but in assisted living,  someone’s going to notice my room mate sitting in a wheelchair outside my room for at least an hour to get the return value on  that Brazillian I pay for every month.

I’ve done my time laying around in pain waiting for medications to be developed to cure scleroderma and sarcoidosis.  The diseases have  run their course.  My lungs are scarred, I have lost mobility in my hands and I still deal with chronic pain.  For me, the worst is over.  I no longer wish to raise awareness of scleroderma.  I want to make patients aware that if they can just keep fighting, and  remember to start fighting again when giving up (I’ve given up plenty of times), that there can be life with scleroderma.  Right now, you might be fighting to breathe.  There is a chance you can make it through this, and if you do, there is so much life to live.  Look, there will always be a time when our bodies will tell us we are ready to move on, that it is time to not give up, but accept that it’s time to leave this life behind, scleroderma or not.  For those patients out there wondering how they can live with the damage, it can be done.  It will take work, there will be disappointment and there will be some success.

The only thing I hate more than having scleroderma, is when someone tells me they are sorry.  I know people don’ really know how to react, and maybe patients appreciate it when hear someone is sorry they have scleroderma, but not me.  It doesn’t anger me, it enrages me.  It’s not that I don’t appreciate them feeling something, but sympathy?  I’m not dead yet, Mother F*cker!  And it usually in a doctor’s office where I am trying to get routine care so I can maintain my health.  I don’t want sympathy from a healthcare provider.  How about some empowerment with care that encourages me to be active?   Luckily, I get that at The West Los Angeles VA Hospital.  I also got it at Loma Linda.  Long Beach sucked.  (That’s my review of those three hospitals.)

So that is my ugly, honest rant.  It’s how I really feel about fundraiser drives to support advertising and teal-wearing and showing pictures people without scleroderma will scroll past on Facebook because it is so shocking.  Hell, I scroll past a picture of a scleroderma patient clearly suffering.  It sucks.  Not as much as having the scleroderma, but it’s definitly hurting the fundraising.  Save the Tatas, raises money because people love to see boobs.  Groups who post the worst and seek sympathy, shock people away from  learning about scleroderma, because to someone who doesn’t have it, it’s hard to see.   I know, it’s not what any of us wants to hear, but does that make it any less true?

 

        

I had been married nearly eleven years when I told my husband I wanted to separate a while.  We eventually divorced, with all the ugliness that comes with such an event.  Then, things started going well between us, but it didn’t happen overnight, but we definitely have a better relationship now, than when we were married.

My ex-husband and I were forced to not only stay in contact, but learn to work together for the sake of our son.  It wasn’t easy.  There was hair pulling, biting and temper tantrums; and my son wasn’t so happy about it either.  Then, one day, I did the unthinkable.  I told my ex that I thought it was best my son be with him full time.

It was not an easy decision, but it was the right decision.  My son’s father and I have joint custody, so the first few years, we split my son’s time during the week.  That meant half the week he was with  me, half the week he was with his father.  It was a rotation of four days on, three days off, and the next week was three days on and four days off.  Funny thing about that rotation, that was the watch schedule for my job as a Radioman, in the Navy.  Four days on, three days off, four nights on, three days off. then back to days to do it all again.  My body and mind never really adjusted to that schedule, and I was in my 20′s.  That same type of schedule was not working for my son either.   I had even moved into the same housing track as his father, step-mom and step-sister, but you know, my son needed consistency.  Sure, it was great to be so close.  And for us as his parents, it was nice to be able to be with him half of the time, but my son switching homes every four days reminded me of my childhood:  Not really feeling at home anywhere.

Growing up, we moved a lot.  I went to eleven different schools in twelve years; six elementary schools, two junior highs and three high schools.  I know the name of every school, except for kindergarten.  That was somewhere in Fullerton.  I felt at home at my grandparent’s house, because that was where we lived most.

When my parents first divorced, I saw my dad more.  We would go with him on Sundays  to Fountain Valley Fun Center and ride bumper boats, play video games and drive the track at Malibu Grand Prix.  It was great!   My parents worked things out between them, mostly.  It was far from perfect, but aren’t all parents winging it?  I love my parents, and I would get frustrated with their choices and sometimes I still do, but since my own divorce, I have become less judgmental.

My son’s rotation was not working for me either.  When I didn’t have my son, I stayed home because I was broke.  I spent my money on the three bedroom house I rented and things for and to do with my son.  I realized this was unhealthy, when a friend came to visit and I could not hear out of my right ear.  I hadn’t noticed it, because I was constantly alone when not with my son.  I went to see my doctor about my hearing, and I had so much wax build up, I could not hear out of my right ear.  That’s when I realized I needed to make a change, because I did nothing when I wasn’t with my son.  I watched TV.  I wrote in my blog.  On the surface it seemed like I had a life, but when people asked me what I liked to do, I had no answer.  Then one day I realized that my son and I would both do better, if he were with his dad full time.

It wasn’t because I thought I was a bad mom, but because I felt it was what was best for my son.  In addition to being broke, I had doctor’s appointments and hospitals stays.  The nearest medical facility that could handle my complicated diagnosis, was forty-seven miles away.  My commute could be anywhere between fifty minutes to three hours, one way depending on traffic.  I was constantly late to pick up my son, or to his school events because of traffic.

When I told my son’s dad I thought it would be best form my son that he were with him full time, I had expected a fight, but instead it opened up our communication and cooperation.  Look, it wasn’t perfect at first, but my son not only had a step-sister, he lived with his step-sister.  They had met at age five.  They are nine months apart and had already bonded as brother and sister when they were together, but once he lived with her full time, his behavior improved, and he seemed more relaxed.

Of course, I got the expected criticism from some family members.  One aunt even said to me, “Karen, how can you let another woman raise your son?  How is he going to know who his mother is?”

Of course, my son was sitting right next to me, playing Minecraft on his iPad.  Because family will always question your parenting, right in front of your child.  That’s their way of showing you they love you, right?   I looked at my son and said, “Jake, who’s your mommy?”

“You are.” He replied without skipping a beat.

Then my cousin spoke up, in my defense, and a few other people did as well.  I felt loved that day.  My great aunt asked me an honest question that was hurtful, and my cousins stepped up in my defense.  I was feelin’ the love that day.

Until recently, I felt I had to explain why I was not with my son full-time.  I felt I had to explain that my son was with his dad and step mom not because I had gone off the deep end, or have a meth addiction.  I was so insecure about it, I found myself standing on the sideline of my son’s flag football game, explaining to other parents why I’m not crazy.  Sounds crazy, right?  You betcha!

I would explain my need to be near a medical facility and I needed a hobby so why not stand-up comedy, but that happened only once at flag football.   On my way  back to LA after attending my son’s game, I looked over at the eleven year-old, tucked in under a down jacket I bought in the 1990′s, sound asleep.  He had a great game, a great day and a great week. I no longer felt guilty.  I felt relieved.

You see, even though I was in LA, his step-mom posted pictures on Facebook.  Every time I saw a picture of him, I saw a happy, confident kid.  I thought it was just me.  Of course, this wasn’t just me.  This past Friday,there was a pizza party after my son’s game.  I sat next to my son’s step mom, next to her was my son’s dad, who was also the team’s coach.  Across the table was who I thought was the assistant coach, and his wife.  It turned out, who I thought was the assistant coach, was someone my son’s dad asked to volunteer to help him coach, which is something I always liked about my son’s dad.  If he didn’t know how to do something, he would find someone who did and learn from them.  Who I thought was the assistant coach, was actually a professional trainer of football players grade 1-8.  Does his opinion really matter to me?  Not really, except for that night at the pizza party.

This trainer and my son’s dad were talking about the game the team had just won.  My son is the center.  For those of you who know nothing of football, that’s the player who hikes the ball to the quarterback.  The coaches have a playbook and some are referred to as plays for individuals who receive the ball.   I had only recently heard my son Jake was a receiver in one of these plays.    The trainer said to my son’s dad, “Be sure to use Jake’s play in the next game.  He’s getting confident and he’s ready.”

Now, that seems like a pretty generic statement.  But to a parent like me, who like all moms have a healthy amount of Mommy-Guilt, in addition to the guilt of not personally caring my son every day, I did a little happy-dance in my head.  (I hope.  I am pretty sure no one else saw me dancing in my seat.  One can never be too sure sometimes.)

I was excited to hear from a total stranger, that my son was becoming more confident, and ready to take on new challenge  That even though I left my son’s hometown to pursue what some may be viewing as a midlife crisis, my son was growing up healthy, happy, confident and a kid who knows he’s loved.  As a parent, that is the best possible outcome, no matter what the custody arrangements or income.

So, next time you see a family and the ex-wife and step-mom get along, and it seems nontraditional to you, please consciously replace the word nontraditional with happy.  Because no matter what the family dynamic, a happy family is one that works together to provide what’s best for their children.

 

Healthy, happy, confident, loved and knows he’s loved. Who can argue with reults like that?

        

 

The title of my last post is, “I Hate The Documentary, Project Scleroderma: Beneath The Surface”.  I thought about changing the title, but I have decided to keep it, and follow up with this post.  I take you on a scenic route to my point, so feel free to jump to the paragraph that is headed in bold type, for my point.    There is nothing simple about scleroderm.  Every patient is different.  

The documentary itself, is a labor of love by those who created it.     I have seen clips and is very well done.  This documentary

See Project Scleroderma. Learn about scleroderma and share link with friends.

is needed because it informs and educates.  What I may have failed to relay in the last post, is that in addition to my denial,  I hate the lack of education throughout the medical community.    And then there is the issue of  spell check here in this Word Press program, that insists on auto-correcting scleroderma to sclerosis.  I’ve been acutely ‘aware’ of scleroderma for over twenty years.  To say that I am beyond frustrated about how little people know about scleroderma, is an understatement.  Luckily there are people who care enough to donate their time and money to amplify the voices of those with scleroderma.

For twenty years, I have been raising so-called awareness.  Friends and family “like” my blog’s Facebook Page, but never share my posts.  I wouldn’t mind that so much if they weren’t so quick to share every Bible verse or “Save the Tatas” meme.  I haven’t had the guts to say this to friends and family, until now.

Dear Family and Friends,

Thank you for asking me how I’m doing and offering to help out, but I would really appreciate it if you would follow up with action like sharing things from my blog- or at least reading it.  These memes that you post like “Share if you agree cancer sucks”, seem nice.  But I think we can all agree you are sharing the obvious.  How about sharing something about an illness that few people know about like, oh I don’t know.. maybe scleroderma?  It’s great to see all your selfies at breast cancer runs and the swag you spent a ton of cash on, but when I post about fund raisers why is it so quiet?  Seriously all you have to do is share and donate a dollar when there are fundraisers.

There are many of you who do, but you know who you are.

XXOO

Karen

This post may be too honest, but it’s not like anyone reads my blog anyway.  I have avoided speaking out to friends and family on Facebook, because I don’t like to complain, and let’s face it:  More people have been affected by things like breast cancer.  But just because another disease gets more ink, that doesn’t mean I shouldn’t speak up every now and then and say: Ahem.. Over here please!

Yesterday, I posted about hating Project Scleroderma:  Beneath The Surface.  And if I can express my feelings about dreading to watch the documentary spearheaded by a woman who lost her mom to scleroderma within four months of her diagnosis, it would be irresponsible of me to be honest to strangers and not my friends, family or acquaintances.  What it boils down to, I hate having something no one else has heard of.   I hate that people share something every day about cancer or God, but rarely share about scleroderma.  I hate being a scleroderma patient.

Scleroderma: Beneath The Surface, will help spread the word about scleroderma.  Every day, I am reminded that there is very little publicity about scleroderma.  I was recently told by a customer service representative at the Social Security Disability office, that her understanding of scleroderma is that it’s a skin condition.   I wasn’t rude about it, but I did explain to her what scleroderma does to a human.  That it’s far more serious than a skin condition or rash.  She was shocked, and I was encouraged by her willingness to learn.  I was both encouraged and annoyed that someone who works with disabled Americans, thought scleroderma was just a skin condition.  Just thinking about it, makes my hair hurt.

Just because scleroderma doesn’t  have the coverage breast cancer “enjoys”, I do not want to diminish how serious breast cancer is, and how its publicity has saved lives.  Of course breast cancer continues to kill men and women and still there is so much to be done.     Many organizations have made progress because of generous donations.  What I see in addition to this great work, is a new industry, and that is something I am not fond of.

We don’t have to agree about everything, but we do agree scleroderma needs to be cured.
So many wonderful  Americans,  found ways to fund treatment for patients who could not get it, with fundraising.   That is a wonderful and selfless accomplishment.  And somehow, all of these good intentions have created the Disease and/or Cause market of swag.  We all love swag.  I don’t know about you, but swag that tells me I’ve done something good gives me a warm and fuzzy feeling.   Swag needs to be manufactured, marketed and sold.  Swag has become profitable when added to big named brands.   Do you really believe the National Football League would come out with all that Pink merchandise, if they did not profit from it?

I think it’s wonderful when communities come together.  Meanwhile, many individuals who belong to these communities, complain that giving all citizens access to healthcare, no matter what they could pay, is wrong because it’s socialism.  Now, before you stop reading this post because I do argue for universal healthcare for all in The United States, hear me out.

People have told me for years that I deserve the best, because I am a veteran.  I disagree.  I deserve the best because I am a human being.  I believe all who are in the United States should have access to the care they need, not what an insurance company or government program is willing to pay for that specific care.   Sure, I’m a veteran and I have scleroderma. But wouldn’t my family feel that I deserved the best possible care if I were not a veteran?  What if I was you daughter, sister, wife, mother or child?  Would you still feel that it would be okay that  I am denied treatment because I cannot pay for it?  I am also arguing is that veterans have friends and family,  they would like to see get the medical treatment they need.  (One, two, three, what are we really fighting for?) I have had access to the greatest treatment at the time, for scleroderma after fighting in both the VA system and private sector with what was nicknamed, Golden Insurance.

When things were going well for the business my ex-husband and I owned in the early 2000′s,  I chose the company’s health insurance plan.  Back then, no matter how much money my spouse made, no insurance company could provide the comprehensive coverage I needed, due to my pre-existing condition of scleroderma, unless I was employed.  So, I worked from home and chose such a comprehensive package for our company, it was one of the many reasons our company went bankrupt.  I already had access to great care at Loma Linda Veteran’s Hospital.  The Chief of Rheumatology told us that my prognosis was getting worse.  That if we had private insurance, he would recommend me to a colleague who just happened to be the Chief of Rheumatology at UCLA Medical center.  That admission of, “I don’t know what to do next, but I’m going to find someone who might”, saved my life.  I owe my life to this great rheumatologist who knew the difference between doing what’s best for his patient, and doing only what he could.  Of course, my ticket to the land of affordable second opinions, was money.  (That reads funny to me as well, and it’s not my grammar.)

If I did not have insurance, my rheumatologist could have referred me to the West Los Angeles VA, which could have taken months.  Meanwhile, Veteran’s health Care was overwhelmed with casualties returning from Iraq and Afghanistan.  The Veteran’s Healthcare system was already overcrowded and underfunded before two wars.  My yet to be diagnosed sarcoidosis was simply written off as a symptom of scleroderma, and nothing could be done.  So my appointment with a UCLA associated rheumatologist might have taken as long as a year to be seen.  My difficulty breathing was dismissed by local doctors and emergency departments in Murrieta and the Loma Linda VA hospital as a symptom of scleroderma.  I know this because these things were written in my medical records by whatever resident doctor in the Emergency Room was, who just happened to have little experience with scleroderma patients.  At UCLA, my biopsy was expedited because after my pulmonologist at UCLA reviewed several of my chest CT scans from other facilities, he read in the notes that I should have further testing for lymphoma.  Following the recommendations of the radiologist’s report of these scans, was a another note commenting the testing for lymphoma results was unnecessary because I had a pre-exisiting condition of scleroderma.  The pulmonologist at UCLA ordered a PET scan and the lymhnodes in my chest lit up like a Christmas tree on steroids.  There had to be a biopsy done, because everything pointed to cancer.  A biopsy of my lymph nodes and lungs were done less than two weeks later.  Granulaomas known as sarcoidosis, were found in my lymph nodes.  This discovery was huge.  My rheumatologist at UCLA ordered a medication that my Golden insurance company and Veteran’s Healthcare formulary, both required the failure of two other drugs before using Remicade.  So, my rheumatologist provided the golden insurance company evidence to support my need to skip right over the formulary, and allow for Remicade.  It took some time, but in less than six weeks, I received my first infusion of Remicade at my local hospital in Murrieta, not eighty-five miles away at UCLA.  The cost was $22,00o per infusion.  (Yes, that is a five-figure number for one dose of medication that by the way, saved my life.)

There is no way of knowing for sure if the Remicade stopped the scleroderma from hardening my lungs or the sarcoidosis from making my lymhnodes so large, I would be unable to get the proper amount of oxygen in my blood and my heart would fail.  What I do know is that eight years after my diagnosis of sarcodosis, I maintain a stable prognosis.    My treatment with a medication that was $22,000 a pop was transferred to the the Veteran’s Hospital at Loma Linda.  The rheumatologist who ordered it there, the Chief of Rheumatology presented evidence to counter the formulary restrictions, based not only what was provided to my Golden Insurance’s formulary, but my progress since the treatment began.

There is a continuity of care requirement for medications that are benefiting a patient when there is a change of insurance.  I was not able to stay on Remicade because simply because I was already on it.  There was a record the Golden Insurance company had, of the valid research backing this decision, and there was evidence that in my case, no matter what was being suppressed by this strong immunosuppressant, the drug was working.  At this time, there is no way to know of knowing what Remicade worked to fix.  I am one patient with both scleroderma and sarcoidosis.  Both chronic illnesses are rare and I have yet to know of another human with both.  My rhumatologist at UCLA, who is a leader in scleroderma treatment around the world, just recommended what he thought would be best, based on research that existed at the time and his experience.  (The world reference is not an understatement. My doctor is **Dr. Daniel Furst.  Go ahead.  Google him.  We’ll wait…)
But what does this have to do with a documentary about scleroderma?
I live in Southern California.  My location alone, allows me access to doctors who have experience with scleroderma, and/or who are actively overseeing and doing scleroderma research.  The Veteran’s Hospitals in highly populated areas like LA and Loma Linda are teaching hospitals where young minds go to learn and make progress in treatment and diagnoses because they are med students working with those who teach, do research and have mountains of experience and work, they can build upon to improve care.  Teaching hospitals are where progress in treatment are made, and save lives.   UCLA doctors and faculty are the specialists who see patients at the West LA VA.  Not everyone has as good an outcome as I have had.  I am aggressive when it comes to my care.  Being able to fight for my care, and get it, has a lot to do with my location.  If I lived in Bakersfield, I would have to drive, or take a bus provided by the VA, to see doctors at the West Los Angeles, VA.  Why do I know this?  Because there are not enough facilities for veterans to get the care and specialization they need in Bakersfield.  They travel to LA.  This is nothing unique.  When I lived in La Crosse, Wisconsin, I had to travel three hours by car, one-way to get the care I needed.  At one time, I lived across the street from a hospital that consulted with the Mayo Clinic.  Yet I still had to drive three hours one way to see a rheumatologist my VA Healthcare would cover.

Doctors need to be educated, and get the most current information and resources available to treat their patients.  Patients should not have to cut medication in half so they can get almost the right dose they need, to save an insurance company money.  In fact, insurance companies are the consumers to pharmaceutical companies.  The statement: “Cutting medication decreases the cost to the consumer”, is incomplete.  Sure, it does cut the cost to both patient and insurance company.  Production of medication using the same dosage, increases the profit a pharmaceutical company makes because it does not have to pay for the production costs of a smaller dose of the medication.  So we’re inconveniencing and sometimes hindering the care of  patients to save a buck.  Someone has to make a sacrifice, and it’s going to be a company who answers to shareholders.  The company or insurance company does not serve the consumer (patient).  It serves the bottom line and it’s shareholders.

From my perspective, medication is viewed as a luxury item, by those who don’t need it.  Medication is not a luxury item.  Medication extends, improves and saves the lives of We The People.  Should anyone be denied lifesaving treatment, simply because they cannot afford it?  No, but this has become The American Way.  Because providing healthcare to all that is paid for by the Federal Government would be socialist.  Yet aren’t we entitled to “Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness”?  No, because for some reason it has become the norm to deny people medical treatment they are unable to pay for, and allow them to die.  Wait, I know the reason.  It’s because we want the freedom not to pay for people less fortunate, like those who are sick and disabled, taking advantage of hardworking Americans.  People have limited access to treatment and qualified practitioners.  When something the government creates to help those who need medical care but can’t afford it, many companies who benefit by profiting on expensive medication, spend millions to stop expanding care to people who can’t afford care.  Not because they are cruel, but because it’s in the best interest of the shareholders.  A company cannot be cruel or compassionate.  It is a company and exists merely to earn a profit, no matter how helpful they appear.  (Companies are not people, my friends.)

Finally, my point:
Scleroderma Project:  Beneath The Surface, needs to be seen to show that swag is not what patients need.  Sure, swag is nice and don’t we all look good in pink or teal on Instagram at the most recent Race for The Cure?  I’m tired of swag.  I’m tired of merchandise.  Why is it that the disease with the best lobbyists gets all the funding for research?  I would love to see less people dressed in a color for their cause, and more money going straight to research for their cause.  I don’t hate the documentary itself.  I hate what the United States has become and that we need to show people suffering slow, painful deaths to prove that research for scleroderma needs funding, and is not simply a skin condition.  So download the movie, watch it then share a link to it and say a little something about it when you do.  The world needs to learn about scleroderma.  Watching and sharing is what you can do to help scleroderma patients like me.

Download Movie

 

** Dr. Furst educates rheumatologists around the world.  If you would like to find a doctor near you, please contact the Scleroderma Foundation by visiting Scleroderma.org  and you will find a doctor closest to you that has proper experience and education.  Dr. Furst works with my team of rheumatologsts who treat me through the VA.  This is because of my geographical location.  

Be sure to visit Project Scleroderma on Facebook and like their page along with Scleroderma Research Foundation and The Scleroderma Foundation.  Thank you!